Feature

Oscar Nominations 2015: Snubs and Surprises

Nelson Tracey shares his thoughts on Marion Cotillard and Steve Carell's selections, Selma and The Lego Movie's snubs, and much more. There is a lot to take in this year, as is the case usually, and Oscar nominations are proof that you never know exactly what to expect from this morning, no matter how much thought goes into predictions. READ MORE...

CINEMACY Selects: ‘The Retrieval’

Director Chris Eska is nominated for an Independent Spirit Award for this Civil War set, bounty hunter-budget film. The best part about Netflix’s selection of streamable movies is that it allows for obscure, micro-budget films to find an audience that would otherwise unknowingly opt for something more commercial. This Cinemacy Select, The Retrieval, is a prime example of this phenomenon. READ MORE...

Starz Denver Film Fest 2014: ‘White Shadow’, ‘Wrenched’, ‘Two Days, One Night (Deux Jours, Une Nuit)’

While Denver does not attract as massive of a crowd of industry folk, every film I saw had a full house of patrons, and there is interest here akin to the higher-profile festivals. I was able to catch the last 2 days of the 10-day festival but still managed to see a great cross-section of festival movies. While the Denver Film Festival does not attract as massive of a crowd of industry folk, every film I saw had a full house of patrons, and there is interest here akin to the higher-profile festivals. Here are my thoughts on each one, as well as a bit on when their planned release is. READ MORE...

CINEMACY Selects: ‘Punch-Drunk Love’

There’s a common feeling when you start watching a movie on Netflix. As the movie begins, you’re still adjusting the position where you’re sitting, the volume, the brightness. It’s usually a little harder than a movie theater to dive right into a movie. In my own case, when I first watched Punch-Drunk Love on Netflix, I was still just getting into the movie when less than 5 minutes in, a random, chaotic event immediately sucks in your attention. The moment might feel like a gimmick, but from that point forward, you’re going to be engulfed in the movie. READ MORE...

CINEMACY Selects: ‘Kinky Boots’

However, only one of these movies made its way to Broadway, and that is Kinky Boots. Released in the UK in 2005, followed by Sundance and the US in 2006, today the title is more known for the massive Broadway hit that it currently stands as. However, there would have never been the show without the movie, and the movie can stand firmly in place alone. READ MORE...

CINEMACY Selects: ‘Witness’

Digging a little further back into Netflix’s extensive movie archive, you’ll find Witness, one of the major award-winning movies of 1985. From the opening scene, we see what appears to be images from the early US frontier: a community of old-fashioned dressed people gather for a funeral. The title card: Pennsylvania, 1985. No, we’re not in the 19th Century as first impressions lead us to think, we’re deep in Amish country in what was present day at the movie’s release. READ MORE...

CINEMACY Selects: ‘Short Term 12’

Watch the first five minutes of Short Term 12, at least until the title comes up, you will without a doubt you be hooked on watching the remainder of this indie drama that came out last summer. The title comes from the film’s setting, a transitional home for kids of all ages between foster homes. At the center of the story is Grace (Brie Larson), one of the more experienced caretakers who has seen it all when it comes to taking care of kids, as well as her fiancée Mason (John Gallagher Jr.). READ MORE...

CINEMACY Selects: ‘Stories We Tell’

Stories We Tell is a documentary revolving around the family of Canadian director Sarah Polley, who, as we learn over the film’s runtime, had quite the tumultuous past. Through a series of interviews and archive footage, she weaves together an intimate story in which everyone involved tells their version of her family’s story. The central focus here is Polley’s late mother, whose wild ways would leave an impact on everyone she encountered, but none more than the director herself. READ MORE...